Homemade Sweet Chili Sauce

Homemade sweet chili sauce is sweet, spicy, and simple - perfect on chicken, shrimp, rice, or egg rolls.

Homemade sweet chili sauce: it’s sweet, spicy, simple, and delicious on pretty much anything. I’ve been buying sweet chili sauce for years, and I always wondered if I could make it better myself. I tried a few different methods, some more successful than others, and finally landed on this one as my favorite. I like this method because the consistency is great; not too syrupy or too watery. 

Sweet, spicy, and simple - this sauce is perfect on chicken, shrimp, rice, or egg rolls.

If you’ve never tried sweet chili sauce before, you are really missing out. My favorite way to eat it as a dipping sauce for veggie spring rolls. But it’s great on chicken, shrimp, salmon, rice, or almost anything. Today I was so excited to eat it that I mixed it in with some quinoa and ate it as a snack.

Get the recipe

Easy Homemade Salsa Verde

This salsa verde is so easy, and way better than store-bought salsa. You're only a few ingredients and about 15 minutes away from your most delicious salsa verde ever!

I love salsa: salsa roja, corn salsa, pico de gallo, mango salsa, I’d be happy to eat salsa every single day. But I think salsa verde might just be my favorite. I bought salsa verde for years without thinking about making it myself, for some reason I always thought it was going to be difficult or require complicated ingredients. Last year my family planted a large garden for the first time and we made salsa verde from our own homegrown tomatillos.  It was hands down the best salsa verde I’ve ever had, and I couldn’t believe how easy it was. After that summer I’ve never gone back to store-bought salsa verde.

This salsa verde is so easy, and way better than store-bought salsa. You're only a few ingredients and about 15 minutes away from your most delicious salsa verde ever!

While traditional red salsa is tomato based, salsa verde is tomatillo based. If you’ve never cooked with or purchased tomatillos, they’re those small green tomatoes with husks on them. They’re not actually tomatoes, just a member of the tomato family and they have a bright, fruity flavor that I think comes out especially well when they’re roasted. 

Get the recipe


5-Ingredient Spanish Rice (Mexican Rice or Arroz Rojo)

This quick and easy Spanish Rice is a perfect side dish for any Mexican or Spanish dinner. Made with only 5 (or 6) ingredients, it's simple and delicious.

Ah, Spanish Rice. It makes me think of one of my favorite Mexican restaurants in my home town – the type of place that serves huge combo plates of Spanish Rice, refried beans and carnitas, all covered in cheese. For years I ate Spanish Rice in restaurants and for some reason was overwhelmed by the idea of making it at home, but once I looked at a few recipes, I saw how easy it really was. When I finally made it myself, I couldn’t believe I hadn’t done it before.

This quick and easy Spanish Rice is a perfect side dish for any Mexican or Spanish dinner. Made with only 5 (or 6) ingredients, it's simple and delicious.

get the recipe

Fool-Proof Buttermilk Biscuits from Scratch

Step by step directions for making fool-proof light, flaky, buttery buttermilk biscuits from scratch. No baking mixes or canned biscuits required.

When I think of classic homemade buttermilk biscuits I think buttery, flaky, and simple… but if you’re familiar with the process of making homemade biscuits you’ll know it’s not always quite so simple. Once you start looking for the perfect buttermilk biscuit recipe you’ll find yourself caught in the middle of many arguments: shortening vs. butter, self-rising flour vs. all-purpose, pastry cutter vs. food processor…

While on the search for the perfect fool-proof buttermilk biscuits from scratch, I studied more than 20 different recipes, watched more videos than I can remember, and thought way more about biscuits than any one person should. My goal was to develop a fool-proof recipe that was delicious, flaky, relatively simple, and made with ingredients you most likely already have on hand, and this recipe ended up being one of my new favorites.

Canned biscuits are easy and all over Pinterest, but if you’ve never made homemade biscuits before I dare you to make these and taste the difference. Don’t be nervous, I’m here to guide you step by step.


Step by step directions for making fool-proof light, flaky, buttery buttermilk biscuits from scratch. No baking mixes or canned biscuits required.

The Ingredients

Buttermilk is (of course) the key ingredient in buttermilk biscuits, but I never have it on hand and when I do buy it, half the bottle ends up going bad before I can use it. I chose to use a buttermilk substitute instead of the real thing, adding a small amount of vinegar to milk and letting it sit for about 10 minutes.

Most biscuit recipes call for unsalted butter, but a recipe that calls for unsalted butter also calls for me to make an additional trip to the grocery store, which I’m not interested in. If you would prefer to use unsalted butter just add 1 teaspoon of table salt to the flour mixture.

I also chose to skip shortening in this recipe, which is really just a matter of personal preference. Of course biscuits aren’t a health food, but I generally try not to use shortening unless absolutely necessary.

Step by step directions for making fool-proof light, flaky, buttery buttermilk biscuits from scratch. No baking mixes or canned biscuits required.

The Process

The cardinal rule of buttermilk biscuit making is don’t overwork the dough, but it is possible to under-work it. Southern Living suggests that 15 stirs is the perfect number of times to stir your dough, but because the dough starts to really come together at the end and becomes a little difficult to stir, I say 15-18.

If rule #1 of making buttermilk biscuits is don’t overwork the dough then rule #2 is don’t twist the cutter. For some reason twisting the cutter just feels right, but when you do the edges of the dough are sealed, preventing maximum rise.

Most people use a pastry cutter to combine the butter with the dry ingredients in a buttermilk biscuit recipe; some people use a food processor. I say skip them both and use a cheese grater instead. It’s the easiest way to easily distribute the fat into the flour mixture and keep the butter cold at the same time. This recipe requires a whole stick of frozen butter, but only 6 out of 8 tablespoons go directly into the dough. The reason you don’t want to cut the 2 tablespoons off of the stick before grating is that the easiest way to grate the butter is to keep the stick whole, peel back the wrapping to the beginning of the 7 tablespoon mark and grate it down until there are only 2 tablepoons left. It keeps your hands clean and keeps you from slicing your fingers on the cheese grater.

Some argue that you must roll your buttermilk biscuit dough out with a rolling pin because the heat of your hands will warm up the butter, and your biscuits won’t be flaky. Others say you must use your hands because using a rolling pin will activate too much gluten and your biscuits will be tough. I personally prefer to use my hands to press out and shape the dough. It’s much easier to manipulate the dough and I think freezing the dry ingredients and butter makes up for any added heat from your hands.

Step by step directions for making fool-proof light, flaky, buttery buttermilk biscuits from scratch. No baking mixes or canned biscuits required.

Get the recipe

Best Ever Mexican Black Beans

These really are the best ever Mexican black beans. Served as a side, on tacos or salads, or in burritos or enchiladas, they're delicious, quick, and easy!

I know food bloggers are prone to hyperbole, but I really think these are the best ever Mexican Black Beans. I’m aware that it’s crazy to get excited about black beans, but that’s how much I really love this recipe. It’s super versatile and my family absolutely loves it. The recipe can be made in under 15 minutes and all you need is…

These really are the best ever Mexican black beans. Served as a side, on tacos or salads, or in burritos or enchiladas, they're delicious, quick, and easy!

Honestly, I make these black beans so often that I don’t really use a recipe, I just make them from memory. Writing the recipe down reminded me how quick and easy it really is. One thing you’ll notice about this recipe is that it calls for a little less liquid than most Mexican black bean recipes and that means the consistency ends up being slightly different. There’s a little less liquid in the final product and it’s less (for lack of a better word) soupy. If you like you’r black beans served in a little more liquid, feel free to add more tomato juice. I think it is the tomato juice that is the real magic ingredient in this recipe. Most Mexican black bean recipes call for chicken or vegetable stock, but the tomato juice adds so much more flavor.


These really are the best ever Mexican black beans. Served as a side, on tacos or salads, or in burritos or enchiladas, they're delicious, quick, and easy!

It was actually my toddler’s love of this recipe that led to it being made so often in our house. Not too long after his first birthday I made these for the first time. He ate them by the handful, and ended up covered in beans from head to toe. He started asking for beans every night for dinner and eventually I had to make a rule that we would only eat these once a week. He just turned two and still loves these just as much as the first time he ate them.

Get the recipe