Christmas Deviled Eggs

Christmas deviled eggs will be the hit of any holiday party.

Deviled eggs are classic appetizers, welcome at any party table. This week I was asked to bring an appetizer to a big family Christmas party, and I thought if I dressed them up in Christmas colors, deviled eggs would be perfect. I had to smile when I named this recipe “Christmas Deviled Eggs,” because normally Christmas and the devil don’t go together. When I looked into the history of deviled eggs, I learned that sometimes people in the Midwest and South call deviled eggs “angel eggs” when bringing them to church functions.  So you can definitely call these Christmas Deviled Eggs “Angel Eggs” if you prefer.

Plain deviled eggs get dressed up for the holidays with festive red and green garnishes.

Don’t they look pretty all dressed up for the holidays? I served some of them on an old fashioned egg plate my grandmother gave me before she passed away.


Deviled eggs are easy to make, but a little time consuming. Boiling the eggs and removing the shell is the trickiest part of the process. Sometimes the shells won’t come off easily. For this recipe, it’s best not to use farm fresh eggs. Older eggs have dehydrated a bit, so the inside of the egg has pulled away from the shell, making the egg easier to peel. Believe it or not, the eggs sold at grocery stores are usually a couple of weeks old, so they’re perfect for hard boiled eggs.

I think the Instant Pot programmable pressure cooker is by far the easiest way to cook boiled eggs. When you boil eggs in a pressure cooker, the shells don’t stick. If you want to know how to make pressure cooker boiled eggs, check out this post from Barbara Schieving’s blog Pressure Cooking Today.

If you’re going to boil eggs on the stovetop, The Kitchn recommends putting the eggs in a pot, covering with cold water, bringing the water to a boil, then removing the pot from the heat and letting the water cool as the eggs finish cooking. That’s also the way my 8th grade home economics teacher, Mrs. Winder, taught me to do it. If you crack the cooked eggs slightly and soak them in ice water for a few minutes, that will help loosen the shells.

Red and green garnishes turn regular deviled eggs into Christmas deviled eggs.

Once the eggs are boiled and peeled, cut them in half lengthwise and pop out the yolks. You can tell from the photo that these eggs are a little overcooked, but they’re still going to taste fine.

Start a healthier holiday food tradition with Christmas deviled eggs.

There are lots of ways to flavor the yolk mixture for deviled eggs, but I like to use mayonnaise, mustard, dill pickle juice and black pepper. If you don’t have dill pickle juice, substitute white wine vinegar and a little salt. You can use any kind of prepared mustard, but for this recipe I like the tanginess of plain yellow mustard. 

For a small batch of deviled eggs, I mash the yolk mixture with a fork, then continue mashing with a wooden spoon until all the lumps are gone. It takes a little patience to get a smooth mixture. For a big party-sized batch of Christmas Deviled Eggs, it’s a lot easier to prepare the yolk mixture in a food processor.

Christmas deviled eggs are a welcome addition to the holiday table.

Put the yolk mixture in a pastry bag, and use that to fill the center of each egg half. For this recipe, I used a jumbo round tip on the pastry bag.

Sprinkle your deviled eggs lightly with paprika. This adds flavor and color. You can use any kind of paprika, but I like smoked paprika. Garnish each egg half with thinly sliced radishes and a small sprig of parsley. 

Start a healthier holiday food tradition with Christmas deviled eggs.

Deviled eggs are not low fat, but they are a healthy holiday treat compared to cookies and candy, or a cheeseball with crackers. They’re filling and packed with protein. They were definitely a hit at our family Christmas party, and I’m sure they’ll be popular at your holiday celebrations.

Christmas Deviled Eggs, or "Angel Eggs"

Yield: 12 half eggs

Serving Size: 1 half egg

Calories per serving: 53

Christmas Deviled Eggs, or

Start a healthier holiday food tradition with Christmas deviled eggs! Deviled eggs get dressed up for the holidays with red and green garnishes.

Ingredients

  • 6 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons mustard (your favorite – I use plain yellow mustard)
  • 2 teaspoons dill pickle juice (or substitute 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar and ¼ teaspoon kosher salt)
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • Paprika, for garnish (use any kind of paprika - I like smoked paprika)
  • 2-3 radishes
  • 1 bunch parsley

Instructions

  1. Hard boil the eggs and remove the shells. Cut the boiled eggs in half lengthwise, and pop out the yolks.
  2. Put the egg yolks in a bowl with the mayonnaise, mustard, dill pickle juice and black pepper. Mash with a fork, then continue mashing with a wooden spoon until there are no lumps. You can also use a food processor for this step.
  3. Put the yolk mixture in a pastry bag fitted with a jumbo round tip. Use the pastry bag to fill the hole in each half egg with the yolk mixture. If not using a pastry bag, fill the egg halves using a teaspoon.
  4. Sprinkle the deviled eggs lightly with paprika.
  5. Wash and trim the radishes, slice thinly, and cut the slices in half. You need 2 radish pieces for each deviled egg.
  6. Wash and dry the parsley.
  7. Garnish each deviled egg with 2 radish slices and a small sprig of parsley.

Notes

4.5g fat, 3g protein, 0g carbohydrate per half egg.

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Start a healthier holiday food tradition with Christmas deviled eggs! Deviled eggs get dressed up for the holidays with red and green garnishes.

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